Best Mallet Putters for 2020

Best mallet putters for 2020 review

It can sometimes be difficult to discover the most targeted tips for buying a mallet putters. Of course, anyone who wishes to take their game to the next level will need to be aware of some key variables to watch out for (as well as some pitfalls associated with a handful of well-known models). Whether you are new to golf or a seasoned pro, the information below will come in handy. Let's examine what the best in the business have to say as well as why choosing the top mallet putter might be easier than you may think.

Titleist Scotty Cameron Select Mallet Putter

PING Sigma 2 Valor Mallet Putter



OUR Choice

Odyssey Memphis Stroke Lab Mallet Putter



TaylorMade Spider X Mallet Putter



Bettinardi Studio Stock Mallet Putter

Choosing the best mallet putters for 2020 to use

There are some major considerations that should be taken into account before purchasing one of the best mallet putters for 2020.

What is the Best Mallet Putters for You? How to Find a Great Model

There is a good deal of conjecture in regards to whether blade or mallet putters are the best option when on the green. In truth, there are benefits associated with each. One key difference when referring to mallet putters is that they tend to be more forgiving; a great quality if you happen to be a beginner. So, what will you need to keep an eye out for when making a decision? While each of the recommendations below will come in handy, some might prove to be more relevant for your requirements than others. Without any further hesitation, let's begin.

The All-Important Consideration of Weight

One major difference (although normally invisible to the naked eye) is where the centre of gravity is found within a mallet putter. Unlike blades, mallets tend to have their weight distributed towards the toe end of the front. Why is this critical? This type of weight distribution tends to favour shots which miss the sweet spot (1). To put it another way, mallets are more forgiving. Try to select a mallet with the COG as close to the toe end as possible. Experiment with different models to feel their slight differences.

The Question of the Centre Shaft

One of the controversies surrounding putters in general involves where the shaft is placed in relation to the club head. Centre-mounted shafts were actually quite popular during the 1970s and 1980s. While these might have been more aesthetically pleasing, there was also a major drawback. Centre-mounted shafts are associated with some of the smallest sweet spots in the game (a big mistake if you are a beginner). So, it is prudent to choose an offset mounting and hosel.

The Visual Style of the Putter Head

We must remember that the club heads associated with mallet putters are larger than blades due to their very nature. This could be a bit of an issue if you have become accustomed to a greater field of vision. Still, there are many designs which incorporate clear lines of sight found on the top of the head. These are great additions if you find that you are having trouble centring the ball before the shot. If such lines are not present, perform a bit of research to discover where to buy the best mallet putters. The chances are high that they will provide some type of customised fitting service.

The Concept of Weight

Pro golfer Don Hurter has been quoted as saying "Heavier is better than lighter. More loft is better than less loft" (2). Take this concept to heart when choosing a mallet putter. The physics are rather simple. Heavier club heads help the putter to gather inertia before it makes contact with the ball. This results in longer putts and (hopefully) lower handicaps without being forced to sacrifice accuracy. Just be sure to choose a weight that does not prove to be overwhelming.

The Movement Towards Larger Grips

One trend which has been observed in recent years is the tendency for golfers to choose wider and thicker grips. The theory is that wide grips can help to prevent your hands and wrist from twisting during the swing. While this is important, this can also be too much of a good thing. As this video by Golf Monthly explains, an extremely wide grip could cause you to lose the "feel" of the shot. Once again, take some time to experiment with a handful of configurations in order to find which type of grip is the best suited for your game.

Experimenting with Distance

This next segment of expert advice applies just as much to mallet putters as it does to blade variants. Choose between three and five models at your local shop. Place the ball between three and five feet from the hole. Assuming that you have sunk all three shots, move back to between 12 and 15 feet. Repeat the process. Finally, increase the distance to between 25 and 30 feet. It is likely that you will have discovered which mallet putter is the best through the simple process of elimination. This process can also be used on inclines and declines to fully appreciate which model matches your style.

The Speed of the Green

One piece of advice which is often overlooked involves the speed of the greens that you normally play upon. This surface will directly equate with the type of mallet putter you should select. Faster greens tend to be better if they are paired with lighter heads (and the contrary for slower surfaces). As always, test our a few different weights to observe which one(s) have the greatest impact upon your shot.

An Arced Stroke or a Straight Motion?

This consideration is just as important as the others. Most golfers will generally fall into one of two categories:

  • Those who follow a straight path when putting.
  • Those who are known to arc the club.

Believe it or not, these variables will also have an impact upon the type of mallet putter to choose. If you have a consistently straight follow-through, it is best to use a club head that is weighted towards the face and that possesses little to no toe hang. On the other hand, arced shots are more suited for putters with a moderately high toe hang (4). This is due to their larger sweet spot (and therefore more room for forgiveness).

The Shaft Length

We should finally take a moment to mention the length of the shaft. Most mallet putters are equipped with 34-inch shafts. However, it is often possible to have a model customised an inch higher or lower. This will obviously depend upon your height. However, posture also plays a significant role. If you notice that you have the tendency to bend over when lining up for a shot, it might be better to decrease the length of the shaft by an inch or so.

1

Odyssey Memphis Stroke Lab Mallet Putter

PROS

If you wish to take an odyssey into the brave new world of accurate putters, the Stroke Lab series will not let you down. The designers at Odyssey have focused heavily upon the balance within these models and as always, the firm delivers reliable results. Some of the core takeaway points of the Toulon mallet putter include:

  • A very attractive smoky matte finish; ideal to eliminate glare while on the green.
  • A computer-milled face for greater control upon contact.
  • A counterbalanced grip to reduce the sensation of a heavy club head.
  • A graphite shaft.

CONS

Some possible cons include:

  • The centre line atop the club head might be slightly difficult to read.
  • Quite a high price for a mallet putter.

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2

PING Sigma 2 Valor Mallet Putter

PROS

It can be argued that the Sigma 2 line of mallet putters developed by PING is the most revolutionary on our list. A single glance illustrates that the club head is associated with a rather strange shape. However, this visual disparity belies a handful of beneficial qualities within its design:

  • Users can manually adjust the shaft between 32 and 36 inches.
  • A hole within the centre of the club head allows players to scoop up their balls.
  • Significant speed for a club head of this size.
  • A number of club configurations can be chosen.

CONS

Some potential pitfalls that might plague the Sigma 2 include:

  • The adjustable shaft might not provide the level of tactile stability that some players are looking for.
  • Others may find the centre hole slightly unattractive.

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3

TaylorMade Spider X Mallet Putter

PROS

TaylorMade has been a hallmark brand within the golfing community for years and their line of mallet putters is just as impressive. The Spider X brings an attractive design element to the table as well as a new colour scheme which many prefer when compared to the previous bright red version. Some other positive changes include:

  • Colour choices of brushed copper or dark blue.
  • A deep centre of gravity to provide an extra degree of stability.
  • A thick face offers a soft and responsive feel.
  • Balance weight between the toe and heel of the club.

CONS

It is only fair to look at two possible negatives:

  • Some golfers feel that the grip does not feel completely "square".
  • This model is not equipped with the option for a black shaft.

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4

Titleist Scotty Cameron Select Mallet Putter

PROS

It is no shock that the name Scotty Cameron is found within this review section. As he boasts more than 20 years of experience designing and perfecting clubs, expect this Titleist model to live up to his reputation. Some worthwhile features of the Scotty Cameron Select include:

  • The exact same inlay face when compared to other Scotty Cameron clubs.
  • A stainless steel body for extra weight.
  • An aircraft-grade aluminium face insert offers a softer and more forgiving feel.
  • A plumbed and offset shaft neck.

CONS

Here are some potential drawbacks:

  • Some believe that the improvements do not justify the price of this mallet putter.
  • There is no right-handed version of this putter (at least not when this article was created).

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5

Bettinardi Studio Stock Mallet Putter

PROS

While not always seen at the top of many reviews, the fact that the Bettinardi Studio Stock has made our top five illustrates that this firm could very well be set to make waves on the course in the near future. Here are some variables which the designers have included within their Studio Stock line of mallet putters:

  • This putter offers the softest feel when compared to all other Bettinardi models.
  • Feel Impact Technology (FIT) includes grooves that are 20 per cent deeper than past versions.
  • More weight has been placed around the perimeter of the Studio Stock.
  • The club head is comprised of stainless steel; offering a crisp sound upon impact.

CONS

To be fair, the Studio Stock still has some potential pitfalls:

  • Not all players will like the cavity-back version of this mallet putter.
  • Those with a straight stroke may have difficulty adjusting to this design.

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And our Winner is ...

Odyssey Memphis Stroke Lab Putter

These are five of the best mallet putters to use if you are satisfied with nothing less than the best. So, which one has earned the honour of first place? We have taken several factors into account when deciding this title:

  • Weight
  • Balance
  • Forgiveness
  • Overall design

After having examined all of the pros and cons, we have come to the conclusion that the Odyssey Toulon mallet putter deserves to be crowned king in 2020. While we mentioned that it is quite pricey, the amenities should far outweigh this single drawback. An attractive finish, CAD-milled grooves, a heavier club head, and counterbalances found towards the grip are all defining characteristics of the Toulon.

On a final note, always remember that the information and advice contained above is highly subjective. Some suggestions might provide you with the necessary changes while others may be irrelevant for your needs. This is why we have made it a point to offer a balanced approach so that you will be able to make the right decision. Please refer back to this article if needed in the future.

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